Building Big Bento
Our San Francisco office recently joined forces with a local elementary school to compete in a creative sandcastle contest. For this year’s food-based theme, students worked with SOM experts to realize their idea of a bento box sand sculpture while learning about the architectural design process. We’re proud of the “SANDchefs” team! Learn more Building Big Bento
Our San Francisco office recently joined forces with a local elementary school to compete in a creative sandcastle contest. For this year’s food-based theme, students worked with SOM experts to realize their idea of a bento box sand sculpture while learning about the architectural design process. We’re proud of the “SANDchefs” team! Learn more Building Big Bento
Our San Francisco office recently joined forces with a local elementary school to compete in a creative sandcastle contest. For this year’s food-based theme, students worked with SOM experts to realize their idea of a bento box sand sculpture while learning about the architectural design process. We’re proud of the “SANDchefs” team! Learn more

Building Big Bento

Our San Francisco office recently joined forces with a local elementary school to compete in a creative sandcastle contest. For this year’s food-based theme, students worked with SOM experts to realize their idea of a bento box sand sculpture while learning about the architectural design process. We’re proud of the “SANDchefs” team! Learn more

Responding to Light
Singapore’s Changi Airport is a key transportation hub in Southeast Asia and one of the busiest passenger and cargo airports in the world. Terminal 3, designed by SOM, is a steel-and-glass structure with four above-ground levels and a 9-hectare roof that spans ticketing, departure, and arrival areas. 
One of the terminal’s most spectacular features is an aesthetically pleasing overhead light modulation system. Thousands of sensor-driven aluminum louvers both diffuse and reflect light to provide a uniform pattern of illumination throughout the space, minimizing lighting and cooling costs. Responding to Light
Singapore’s Changi Airport is a key transportation hub in Southeast Asia and one of the busiest passenger and cargo airports in the world. Terminal 3, designed by SOM, is a steel-and-glass structure with four above-ground levels and a 9-hectare roof that spans ticketing, departure, and arrival areas. 
One of the terminal’s most spectacular features is an aesthetically pleasing overhead light modulation system. Thousands of sensor-driven aluminum louvers both diffuse and reflect light to provide a uniform pattern of illumination throughout the space, minimizing lighting and cooling costs. Responding to Light
Singapore’s Changi Airport is a key transportation hub in Southeast Asia and one of the busiest passenger and cargo airports in the world. Terminal 3, designed by SOM, is a steel-and-glass structure with four above-ground levels and a 9-hectare roof that spans ticketing, departure, and arrival areas. 
One of the terminal’s most spectacular features is an aesthetically pleasing overhead light modulation system. Thousands of sensor-driven aluminum louvers both diffuse and reflect light to provide a uniform pattern of illumination throughout the space, minimizing lighting and cooling costs.

Responding to Light

Singapore’s Changi Airport is a key transportation hub in Southeast Asia and one of the busiest passenger and cargo airports in the world. Terminal 3, designed by SOM, is a steel-and-glass structure with four above-ground levels and a 9-hectare roof that spans ticketing, departure, and arrival areas. 

One of the terminal’s most spectacular features is an aesthetically pleasing overhead light modulation system. Thousands of sensor-driven aluminum louvers both diffuse and reflect light to provide a uniform pattern of illumination throughout the space, minimizing lighting and cooling costs.

Illustrating Inland Steel
When completed in 1958, the Inland Steel Building became the archetype for the American office. With no interior columns, each floor could be completely customized to the tenant’s liking. The Chicago Architecture Foundation recently highlighted the building as part of its Skyline Stories video series. Watch the video Illustrating Inland Steel
When completed in 1958, the Inland Steel Building became the archetype for the American office. With no interior columns, each floor could be completely customized to the tenant’s liking. The Chicago Architecture Foundation recently highlighted the building as part of its Skyline Stories video series. Watch the video Illustrating Inland Steel
When completed in 1958, the Inland Steel Building became the archetype for the American office. With no interior columns, each floor could be completely customized to the tenant’s liking. The Chicago Architecture Foundation recently highlighted the building as part of its Skyline Stories video series. Watch the video

Illustrating Inland Steel

When completed in 1958, the Inland Steel Building became the archetype for the American office. With no interior columns, each floor could be completely customized to the tenant’s liking. The Chicago Architecture Foundation recently highlighted the building as part of its Skyline Stories video series. Watch the video

Happy Birthday, Hirshhorn!
40 years ago this Saturday, the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum officially opened to the public, becoming the first contemporary and modern art museum on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall. The striking cylindrical building, designed by SOM’s Gordon Bunshaft, is supported by four massive sculptural columns that rise 14 feet above the plaza, allowing visitors to pass under the circular form. Learn more Happy Birthday, Hirshhorn!
40 years ago this Saturday, the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum officially opened to the public, becoming the first contemporary and modern art museum on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall. The striking cylindrical building, designed by SOM’s Gordon Bunshaft, is supported by four massive sculptural columns that rise 14 feet above the plaza, allowing visitors to pass under the circular form. Learn more Happy Birthday, Hirshhorn!
40 years ago this Saturday, the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum officially opened to the public, becoming the first contemporary and modern art museum on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall. The striking cylindrical building, designed by SOM’s Gordon Bunshaft, is supported by four massive sculptural columns that rise 14 feet above the plaza, allowing visitors to pass under the circular form. Learn more

Happy Birthday, Hirshhorn!

40 years ago this Saturday, the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum officially opened to the public, becoming the first contemporary and modern art museum on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall. The striking cylindrical building, designed by SOM’s Gordon Bunshaft, is supported by four massive sculptural columns that rise 14 feet above the plaza, allowing visitors to pass under the circular form. Learn more

Standing Strong in the Windy City
As part of its Skyline Stories video series, the Chicago Architecture Foundation highlights Willis Tower as a seminal skyscraper that helped transform supertall building design. Formerly known as the Sears Tower, the Chicago icon is comprised of nine squared tubes, each rigid within itself without internal supports. The tubes are bundled together and terminate at varying heights, creating a multi-tiered, wind-resistant form. Watch the video Standing Strong in the Windy City
As part of its Skyline Stories video series, the Chicago Architecture Foundation highlights Willis Tower as a seminal skyscraper that helped transform supertall building design. Formerly known as the Sears Tower, the Chicago icon is comprised of nine squared tubes, each rigid within itself without internal supports. The tubes are bundled together and terminate at varying heights, creating a multi-tiered, wind-resistant form. Watch the video Standing Strong in the Windy City
As part of its Skyline Stories video series, the Chicago Architecture Foundation highlights Willis Tower as a seminal skyscraper that helped transform supertall building design. Formerly known as the Sears Tower, the Chicago icon is comprised of nine squared tubes, each rigid within itself without internal supports. The tubes are bundled together and terminate at varying heights, creating a multi-tiered, wind-resistant form. Watch the video

Standing Strong in the Windy City

As part of its Skyline Stories video series, the Chicago Architecture Foundation highlights Willis Tower as a seminal skyscraper that helped transform supertall building design. Formerly known as the Sears Tower, the Chicago icon is comprised of nine squared tubes, each rigid within itself without internal supports. The tubes are bundled together and terminate at varying heights, creating a multi-tiered, wind-resistant form. Watch the video

Suspended Design
Impressive feats of engineering are on display at Poly Corporation Headquarters in Beijing, where an eight-story floating structure juts through the largest cable-net glass wall in the world. Housing the Poly Museum, the “hanging lantern” is suspended from the building’s atrium by means of four parallel strand bridge cables, aided by The Rocker. The crystalline, patterned glass of the museum structure is pleated to increase its light-reflecting and refracting qualities. Learn more Suspended Design
Impressive feats of engineering are on display at Poly Corporation Headquarters in Beijing, where an eight-story floating structure juts through the largest cable-net glass wall in the world. Housing the Poly Museum, the “hanging lantern” is suspended from the building’s atrium by means of four parallel strand bridge cables, aided by The Rocker. The crystalline, patterned glass of the museum structure is pleated to increase its light-reflecting and refracting qualities. Learn more Suspended Design
Impressive feats of engineering are on display at Poly Corporation Headquarters in Beijing, where an eight-story floating structure juts through the largest cable-net glass wall in the world. Housing the Poly Museum, the “hanging lantern” is suspended from the building’s atrium by means of four parallel strand bridge cables, aided by The Rocker. The crystalline, patterned glass of the museum structure is pleated to increase its light-reflecting and refracting qualities. Learn more Suspended Design
Impressive feats of engineering are on display at Poly Corporation Headquarters in Beijing, where an eight-story floating structure juts through the largest cable-net glass wall in the world. Housing the Poly Museum, the “hanging lantern” is suspended from the building’s atrium by means of four parallel strand bridge cables, aided by The Rocker. The crystalline, patterned glass of the museum structure is pleated to increase its light-reflecting and refracting qualities. Learn more

Suspended Design

Impressive feats of engineering are on display at Poly Corporation Headquarters in Beijing, where an eight-story floating structure juts through the largest cable-net glass wall in the world. Housing the Poly Museum, the “hanging lantern” is suspended from the building’s atrium by means of four parallel strand bridge cables, aided by The Rocker. The crystalline, patterned glass of the museum structure is pleated to increase its light-reflecting and refracting qualities. Learn more

Sky-High Living
Al Sharq Tower is a unique mix of iconic form and ingenious structure. A spiraling filigree of structural cables wrap around the perimeter of all nine tubes, allowing for a height of 360 meters. Each of these cylinders, with an individual aspect ratio of 1:30, amplifies the notion of slenderness. Learn more Sky-High Living
Al Sharq Tower is a unique mix of iconic form and ingenious structure. A spiraling filigree of structural cables wrap around the perimeter of all nine tubes, allowing for a height of 360 meters. Each of these cylinders, with an individual aspect ratio of 1:30, amplifies the notion of slenderness. Learn more Sky-High Living
Al Sharq Tower is a unique mix of iconic form and ingenious structure. A spiraling filigree of structural cables wrap around the perimeter of all nine tubes, allowing for a height of 360 meters. Each of these cylinders, with an individual aspect ratio of 1:30, amplifies the notion of slenderness. Learn more Sky-High Living
Al Sharq Tower is a unique mix of iconic form and ingenious structure. A spiraling filigree of structural cables wrap around the perimeter of all nine tubes, allowing for a height of 360 meters. Each of these cylinders, with an individual aspect ratio of 1:30, amplifies the notion of slenderness. Learn more

Sky-High Living

Al Sharq Tower is a unique mix of iconic form and ingenious structure. A spiraling filigree of structural cables wrap around the perimeter of all nine tubes, allowing for a height of 360 meters. Each of these cylinders, with an individual aspect ratio of 1:30, amplifies the notion of slenderness. Learn more

Charting Architecture from Past to Present

This blueprint-style illustration of modern and historic landmarks by Pop Chart Lab highlights the Burj Khalifa, One World Trade Center, Willis Tower, John Hancock Center, Zifeng Tower, and Jin Mao Tower. Our projects are in pretty good company! Check it out

Reinvented for a New Era
When Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company opened its Manhattan branch at 510 Fifth Avenue in 1954, the building’s award-winning design ushered in a bold new era of bank architecture. SOM dematerialized the bank’s walls with transparent glass facades, cantilevered floors, luminous ceilings, and a street-level vault. These elements symbolically opened a cloistered world more commonly housed behind masonry walls.
The same bank branch was revisited by SOM a half-century later, renovating and adapting it for retail use. Drawing on archival research and guided by the original design intentions, the contemporary architects preserved or restored primary components including the facade, Bertoia-designed screen, marble columns, and vault door. Learn more Reinvented for a New Era
When Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company opened its Manhattan branch at 510 Fifth Avenue in 1954, the building’s award-winning design ushered in a bold new era of bank architecture. SOM dematerialized the bank’s walls with transparent glass facades, cantilevered floors, luminous ceilings, and a street-level vault. These elements symbolically opened a cloistered world more commonly housed behind masonry walls.
The same bank branch was revisited by SOM a half-century later, renovating and adapting it for retail use. Drawing on archival research and guided by the original design intentions, the contemporary architects preserved or restored primary components including the facade, Bertoia-designed screen, marble columns, and vault door. Learn more Reinvented for a New Era
When Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company opened its Manhattan branch at 510 Fifth Avenue in 1954, the building’s award-winning design ushered in a bold new era of bank architecture. SOM dematerialized the bank’s walls with transparent glass facades, cantilevered floors, luminous ceilings, and a street-level vault. These elements symbolically opened a cloistered world more commonly housed behind masonry walls.
The same bank branch was revisited by SOM a half-century later, renovating and adapting it for retail use. Drawing on archival research and guided by the original design intentions, the contemporary architects preserved or restored primary components including the facade, Bertoia-designed screen, marble columns, and vault door. Learn more

Reinvented for a New Era

When Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company opened its Manhattan branch at 510 Fifth Avenue in 1954, the building’s award-winning design ushered in a bold new era of bank architecture. SOM dematerialized the bank’s walls with transparent glass facades, cantilevered floors, luminous ceilings, and a street-level vault. These elements symbolically opened a cloistered world more commonly housed behind masonry walls.

The same bank branch was revisited by SOM a half-century later, renovating and adapting it for retail use. Drawing on archival research and guided by the original design intentions, the contemporary architects preserved or restored primary components including the facade, Bertoia-designed screen, marble columns, and vault door. Learn more

Expressively Engineered
Completed in 1967, the distinctive Alcoa Building continues to stand out in San Francisco. Now known as One Maritime Plaza, the building’s external diagonal bracing resists seismic forces and helps support vertical loads. Representative of the collaboration between architects and structural engineers at SOM, a similar system was later used for the John Hancock Center in Chicago. Learn more Expressively Engineered
Completed in 1967, the distinctive Alcoa Building continues to stand out in San Francisco. Now known as One Maritime Plaza, the building’s external diagonal bracing resists seismic forces and helps support vertical loads. Representative of the collaboration between architects and structural engineers at SOM, a similar system was later used for the John Hancock Center in Chicago. Learn more Expressively Engineered
Completed in 1967, the distinctive Alcoa Building continues to stand out in San Francisco. Now known as One Maritime Plaza, the building’s external diagonal bracing resists seismic forces and helps support vertical loads. Representative of the collaboration between architects and structural engineers at SOM, a similar system was later used for the John Hancock Center in Chicago. Learn more

Expressively Engineered

Completed in 1967, the distinctive Alcoa Building continues to stand out in San Francisco. Now known as One Maritime Plaza, the building’s external diagonal bracing resists seismic forces and helps support vertical loads. Representative of the collaboration between architects and structural engineers at SOM, a similar system was later used for the John Hancock Center in Chicago. Learn more

Making Its Mark on the City of Big Shoulders 

Rising 1,361 feet, the Trump International Hotel and Tower is a prominent fixture on the Chicago skyline as the second tallest building in the city. The glass-clad skyscraper is highly contextual, stepping back at different floors to match the scale of neighboring structures. Learn more

A Legend’s Work
Today, we honor the legacy of former Design Partner Myron Goldsmith, born on September 15, 1918. In his lifetime, he was responsible for a number of iconic buildings, including The Republic Newspaper Office and Printing Plant in Columbus, Indiana, named a National Historic Landmark in 2012. Its crisp modern form symbolizes the company’s role in the community and the strict functional requirements necessary to produce a daily newspaper. Originally, the printing press was painted bright yellow and clearly displayed behind the 15-foot-tall glass exterior, raising its role from mere machine to that of functional art. Learn more A Legend’s Work
Today, we honor the legacy of former Design Partner Myron Goldsmith, born on September 15, 1918. In his lifetime, he was responsible for a number of iconic buildings, including The Republic Newspaper Office and Printing Plant in Columbus, Indiana, named a National Historic Landmark in 2012. Its crisp modern form symbolizes the company’s role in the community and the strict functional requirements necessary to produce a daily newspaper. Originally, the printing press was painted bright yellow and clearly displayed behind the 15-foot-tall glass exterior, raising its role from mere machine to that of functional art. Learn more A Legend’s Work
Today, we honor the legacy of former Design Partner Myron Goldsmith, born on September 15, 1918. In his lifetime, he was responsible for a number of iconic buildings, including The Republic Newspaper Office and Printing Plant in Columbus, Indiana, named a National Historic Landmark in 2012. Its crisp modern form symbolizes the company’s role in the community and the strict functional requirements necessary to produce a daily newspaper. Originally, the printing press was painted bright yellow and clearly displayed behind the 15-foot-tall glass exterior, raising its role from mere machine to that of functional art. Learn more A Legend’s Work
Today, we honor the legacy of former Design Partner Myron Goldsmith, born on September 15, 1918. In his lifetime, he was responsible for a number of iconic buildings, including The Republic Newspaper Office and Printing Plant in Columbus, Indiana, named a National Historic Landmark in 2012. Its crisp modern form symbolizes the company’s role in the community and the strict functional requirements necessary to produce a daily newspaper. Originally, the printing press was painted bright yellow and clearly displayed behind the 15-foot-tall glass exterior, raising its role from mere machine to that of functional art. Learn more

A Legend’s Work

Today, we honor the legacy of former Design Partner Myron Goldsmith, born on September 15, 1918. In his lifetime, he was responsible for a number of iconic buildings, including The Republic Newspaper Office and Printing Plant in Columbus, Indiana, named a National Historic Landmark in 2012. Its crisp modern form symbolizes the company’s role in the community and the strict functional requirements necessary to produce a daily newspaper. Originally, the printing press was painted bright yellow and clearly displayed behind the 15-foot-tall glass exterior, raising its role from mere machine to that of functional art. Learn more

On this day, we remember all those affected by the events on September 11th. We are honored to contribute to the ongoing revitalization of Lower Manhattan.

Standing Tall: 7 World Trade Center
Conveying a sense of lightness and establishing a strong street-level presence were central to the design of 7 World Trade Center. The tower rises like a shimmering glass shard, with a curtain wall that reflects the ever-changing sky. The building’s lower portion is clad in a perforated steel screen that was created in collaboration with designer James Carpenter. In the spacious lobby, a captivating light installation by the artist Jenny Holzer draws the attention of passers-by. Learn more Standing Tall: 7 World Trade Center
Conveying a sense of lightness and establishing a strong street-level presence were central to the design of 7 World Trade Center. The tower rises like a shimmering glass shard, with a curtain wall that reflects the ever-changing sky. The building’s lower portion is clad in a perforated steel screen that was created in collaboration with designer James Carpenter. In the spacious lobby, a captivating light installation by the artist Jenny Holzer draws the attention of passers-by. Learn more Standing Tall: 7 World Trade Center
Conveying a sense of lightness and establishing a strong street-level presence were central to the design of 7 World Trade Center. The tower rises like a shimmering glass shard, with a curtain wall that reflects the ever-changing sky. The building’s lower portion is clad in a perforated steel screen that was created in collaboration with designer James Carpenter. In the spacious lobby, a captivating light installation by the artist Jenny Holzer draws the attention of passers-by. Learn more

Standing Tall: 7 World Trade Center

Conveying a sense of lightness and establishing a strong street-level presence were central to the design of 7 World Trade Center. The tower rises like a shimmering glass shard, with a curtain wall that reflects the ever-changing sky. The building’s lower portion is clad in a perforated steel screen that was created in collaboration with designer James Carpenter. In the spacious lobby, a captivating light installation by the artist Jenny Holzer draws the attention of passers-by. Learn more

Art + Architecture: Gallery on the Go
Toronto’s Pearson International Airport is as much a cultural oasis as it is an aviation hub. Featuring a world-class art program, passengers can enjoy works from renowned artists like Sol Lewitt and Richard Serra (pictured), as well as Jonathan Borofsky, Ingo Maurer, Katharina Grosse, and others. Laura Ettelman, SOM Director, speaks about her work on Terminal 1 and other projects in a recent interview. Learn more Art + Architecture: Gallery on the Go
Toronto’s Pearson International Airport is as much a cultural oasis as it is an aviation hub. Featuring a world-class art program, passengers can enjoy works from renowned artists like Sol Lewitt and Richard Serra (pictured), as well as Jonathan Borofsky, Ingo Maurer, Katharina Grosse, and others. Laura Ettelman, SOM Director, speaks about her work on Terminal 1 and other projects in a recent interview. Learn more Art + Architecture: Gallery on the Go
Toronto’s Pearson International Airport is as much a cultural oasis as it is an aviation hub. Featuring a world-class art program, passengers can enjoy works from renowned artists like Sol Lewitt and Richard Serra (pictured), as well as Jonathan Borofsky, Ingo Maurer, Katharina Grosse, and others. Laura Ettelman, SOM Director, speaks about her work on Terminal 1 and other projects in a recent interview. Learn more

Art + Architecture: Gallery on the Go

Toronto’s Pearson International Airport is as much a cultural oasis as it is an aviation hub. Featuring a world-class art program, passengers can enjoy works from renowned artists like Sol Lewitt and Richard Serra (pictured), as well as Jonathan Borofsky, Ingo Maurer, Katharina Grosse, and others. Laura Ettelman, SOM Director, speaks about her work on Terminal 1 and other projects in a recent interview. Learn more